• The Infernal
Instead of cluttering a space with numerous books and tapes on file, the Mediatheque has been re-interpreted as a Digital Library, within which Books, Video, Audio, an other forms of media are culled from the internet by a massive, on-site database and presented to visitors through interactive “Interfaces” located within the mediatheque.
Aggregating an average form from the block structure of the city and its constituent buildings, a cube is generated and placed on the site. To estrange this cube from the city, the shape is rotated about its centroid on three axis. This speculation on the nature of Savannah’s architectural and urban forms creates a sense of allure against Broughton Street’s repetitive context of platonic forms.
The shape’s articulation implies an innate set of intrinsic characteristics that are discrete, and unique to the designed object. These characteristics are, by qualification, unknowable to the viewer of the object; they can be known to exist based upon their evident implications on the form, yet they cannot be quantified by any specific technique. As such, these characteristics exist beneath, and are in tension with the platonic cube. Through a timeline present on the shape, they manipulate the cube into its hyper-articulated form. The hidden, underground nature of these characteristics is Infernal in nature; they are unknowable, but unavoidable in their effect.
The articulation begins as an exhaustion of the initial cube, within which large swaths of geometry are manipulated with a series of figural impressions. This exhaustion serves to change the posture of the shape, adding complexity to a point at which all potential of the geometry is removed. The Infernal bridges the stage between the exhausted and the ungrounded, as the unknown effects of the Infernal articulate the geometry.
The process of fully ungrounding the cube is through the hyper-articulation of its surface, an eating-away of the platonic form from within or without by the Infernal. The mesh is distorted and decayed to the point of complete geometric annihilation. By representing both the platonic and the Infernal on a single form, a gradient of time-frames is established, within which evidence can be seen of the activity of the Infernal on the objects, to greater or lesser degrees, on the platonic primitives. The low-fi articulation of the hull and ground and subsequent high-fi articulation defamiliarizes the platonic forms in such a way as to remove evidence of them in favor of complete annihilation from the Infernal.
Maya, Zbrush, Maxwell.
Published on SuckerPunch.
Invisible Drawing Representation Video on Vimeo
  • The Infernal
Instead of cluttering a space with numerous books and tapes on file, the Mediatheque has been re-interpreted as a Digital Library, within which Books, Video, Audio, an other forms of media are culled from the internet by a massive, on-site database and presented to visitors through interactive “Interfaces” located within the mediatheque.
Aggregating an average form from the block structure of the city and its constituent buildings, a cube is generated and placed on the site. To estrange this cube from the city, the shape is rotated about its centroid on three axis. This speculation on the nature of Savannah’s architectural and urban forms creates a sense of allure against Broughton Street’s repetitive context of platonic forms.
The shape’s articulation implies an innate set of intrinsic characteristics that are discrete, and unique to the designed object. These characteristics are, by qualification, unknowable to the viewer of the object; they can be known to exist based upon their evident implications on the form, yet they cannot be quantified by any specific technique. As such, these characteristics exist beneath, and are in tension with the platonic cube. Through a timeline present on the shape, they manipulate the cube into its hyper-articulated form. The hidden, underground nature of these characteristics is Infernal in nature; they are unknowable, but unavoidable in their effect.
The articulation begins as an exhaustion of the initial cube, within which large swaths of geometry are manipulated with a series of figural impressions. This exhaustion serves to change the posture of the shape, adding complexity to a point at which all potential of the geometry is removed. The Infernal bridges the stage between the exhausted and the ungrounded, as the unknown effects of the Infernal articulate the geometry.
The process of fully ungrounding the cube is through the hyper-articulation of its surface, an eating-away of the platonic form from within or without by the Infernal. The mesh is distorted and decayed to the point of complete geometric annihilation. By representing both the platonic and the Infernal on a single form, a gradient of time-frames is established, within which evidence can be seen of the activity of the Infernal on the objects, to greater or lesser degrees, on the platonic primitives. The low-fi articulation of the hull and ground and subsequent high-fi articulation defamiliarizes the platonic forms in such a way as to remove evidence of them in favor of complete annihilation from the Infernal.
Maya, Zbrush, Maxwell.
Published on SuckerPunch.
Invisible Drawing Representation Video on Vimeo
  • The Infernal
Instead of cluttering a space with numerous books and tapes on file, the Mediatheque has been re-interpreted as a Digital Library, within which Books, Video, Audio, an other forms of media are culled from the internet by a massive, on-site database and presented to visitors through interactive “Interfaces” located within the mediatheque.
Aggregating an average form from the block structure of the city and its constituent buildings, a cube is generated and placed on the site. To estrange this cube from the city, the shape is rotated about its centroid on three axis. This speculation on the nature of Savannah’s architectural and urban forms creates a sense of allure against Broughton Street’s repetitive context of platonic forms.
The shape’s articulation implies an innate set of intrinsic characteristics that are discrete, and unique to the designed object. These characteristics are, by qualification, unknowable to the viewer of the object; they can be known to exist based upon their evident implications on the form, yet they cannot be quantified by any specific technique. As such, these characteristics exist beneath, and are in tension with the platonic cube. Through a timeline present on the shape, they manipulate the cube into its hyper-articulated form. The hidden, underground nature of these characteristics is Infernal in nature; they are unknowable, but unavoidable in their effect.
The articulation begins as an exhaustion of the initial cube, within which large swaths of geometry are manipulated with a series of figural impressions. This exhaustion serves to change the posture of the shape, adding complexity to a point at which all potential of the geometry is removed. The Infernal bridges the stage between the exhausted and the ungrounded, as the unknown effects of the Infernal articulate the geometry.
The process of fully ungrounding the cube is through the hyper-articulation of its surface, an eating-away of the platonic form from within or without by the Infernal. The mesh is distorted and decayed to the point of complete geometric annihilation. By representing both the platonic and the Infernal on a single form, a gradient of time-frames is established, within which evidence can be seen of the activity of the Infernal on the objects, to greater or lesser degrees, on the platonic primitives. The low-fi articulation of the hull and ground and subsequent high-fi articulation defamiliarizes the platonic forms in such a way as to remove evidence of them in favor of complete annihilation from the Infernal.
Maya, Zbrush, Maxwell.
Published on SuckerPunch.
Invisible Drawing Representation Video on Vimeo

The Infernal

Instead of cluttering a space with numerous books and tapes on file, the Mediatheque has been re-interpreted as a Digital Library, within which Books, Video, Audio, an other forms of media are culled from the internet by a massive, on-site database and presented to visitors through interactive “Interfaces” located within the mediatheque.

Aggregating an average form from the block structure of the city and its constituent buildings, a cube is generated and placed on the site. To estrange this cube from the city, the shape is rotated about its centroid on three axis. This speculation on the nature of Savannah’s architectural and urban forms creates a sense of allure against Broughton Street’s repetitive context of platonic forms.

The shape’s articulation implies an innate set of intrinsic characteristics that are discrete, and unique to the designed object. These characteristics are, by qualification, unknowable to the viewer of the object; they can be known to exist based upon their evident implications on the form, yet they cannot be quantified by any specific technique. As such, these characteristics exist beneath, and are in tension with the platonic cube. Through a timeline present on the shape, they manipulate the cube into its hyper-articulated form. The hidden, underground nature of these characteristics is Infernal in nature; they are unknowable, but unavoidable in their effect.

The articulation begins as an exhaustion of the initial cube, within which large swaths of geometry are manipulated with a series of figural impressions. This exhaustion serves to change the posture of the shape, adding complexity to a point at which all potential of the geometry is removed. The Infernal bridges the stage between the exhausted and the ungrounded, as the unknown effects of the Infernal articulate the geometry.

The process of fully ungrounding the cube is through the hyper-articulation of its surface, an eating-away of the platonic form from within or without by the Infernal. The mesh is distorted and decayed to the point of complete geometric annihilation. By representing both the platonic and the Infernal on a single form, a gradient of time-frames is established, within which evidence can be seen of the activity of the Infernal on the objects, to greater or lesser degrees, on the platonic primitives. The low-fi articulation of the hull and ground and subsequent high-fi articulation defamiliarizes the platonic forms in such a way as to remove evidence of them in favor of complete annihilation from the Infernal.

Maya, Zbrush, Maxwell.

Published on SuckerPunch.

Invisible Drawing Representation Video on Vimeo

  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee
  • IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND
Concept
Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis
Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:
Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.
The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’
Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.
The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:
A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.
Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons
Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell
Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee

IMPRESSED OBJECTS @ GRACELAND

Concept

Instead of a series of spaces being layered and/or stacked upon one another, such as in traditional practice, we maintain that sandwiching objects that are both autonomous and anticipatory of other objects provides intriguing programmable space with exceptional sectional qualities. Formally, the overarching design method that we want to suggest is the object sandwich, in which objects are pressed together and forced to relate blindly to each other.

Precedents & Analysis

Peter Eisenman references the notion of the sandwich within his critique of modernism. However, he observes a sandwich of spaces, not objects. Eisenman notes that spaces are sandwiched between horizontal layering of planes. Through this design method, the plan extrudes to become the section, and the section becomes the facade. This horizontal layering of planes in which space is sandwiched between is showcased in both Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and Johnson’s Glass House, even though they differ in execution. In the design of the Farnsworth House, the columns are pushed beyond the facade, whereas the Glass House alludes to an object-like nature by removing apparent columns and inserting a large cylindrical object that protrudes through a rectangular object. The cylindrical object possesses its own inherent space without a continuous horizontal layer. Thus, both are examples of modernism, but the Glass House diverges toward the contemporary discourse of object oriented ontology. Beyond Modernism, horizontal layering is still observed in more recent architecture. Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, a contemporary work, treated the horizontal planes as objects. Although they may appear to be more object-like, they are still series of plans that has been extruded and shifted. Moreover, the library, with its object-like quality, still remains as a series of horizontal layers that sandwich space, not objects. As another evolution of the developing sandwich concept, Koolhaas’ Agadir Hotel proposal incorporates a horizontal layering of spaces visible in two landscape-like objects mirrored into each other. The space between reads like a figural cut, lending an object-like nature to each of the upper and lower objects.

Description:

Formal design operations used were the figural cut and object anticipation. The figural cut is used to reveal the strangeness of the internal objects as well as to increase the definition of the building objects. Additionally, the figural cut conveys heterogeneity of thick and thin space and also as a tool for surface to volume techniques. We propose that the objects attempt to impress on other objects while simultaneously anticipating impressions by the other objects. Object anticipation is seen formally through the use of embedment and protuberance. Embedment displays the nestling of objects within another object while protuberance relates to the slipping of an object through another. It is important to note that all objects in the sandwich stop short of converging.

The objects themselves possess spatial characteristics that are both distinct to each object respectively and independent of the plan. Furthermore, by forcing objects to relate to each other, thereby sandwiching them, there is an interstitial space between the objects that we call the “moment of incompatible relata”. This interstitial space is derived by the anticipation of objects that are attempting to relate to other but fail to adapt. The “moment of incompatible relata” becomes of the misfit between objects.

‘Tattoo’

Precedent for the tattoo is twofold. As observed within the mansion at Graceland, many materials possess a bright and shiny specular quality, and the highlights of the surfaces increase in their excessiveness as the surface becomes more detailed. This inspiration led to the use of fractals for pattern creation. Specifically, the pattern of a Perlin fractal, when properly controlled, maintains the excessive and rippling appearance of the shining surfaces within the Mansion. This fractal is textured with a halftone pattern, reminiscent of Elvis himself, and the spotted patterns prevalent in his stage shows and wardrobe, namely, rhinestones and flamboyant lighting arrays. The combined pattern maintains the specular iridescence of the Graceland surfaces and the excessiveness of Elvis’ stage persona himself.

The tectonic use of a tattoo is to squish the multiple layers of traditional construction into one composite surface. As such, the execution on the objects was to maintain the field as an opaque surface, let the borders of the tattoo pattern act as a frame, and let the inner part of the pattern be transparent, as glazing. On the inner objects, the tattoo again acts as an aperture system, though the material application is different. The field takes on the same color as the outer object’s frames, and the inner material bears a similar color to the field and acts as a one-way mirror, allowing visibility from the inside, but remaining opaque on the outside.

Reflection:

A recurring criticism about object oriented ontology is the language in which is used to articulate the discourse architecturally. There is a rightful understanding that there has to be concessions made in order to manifest architecture from a philosophical platform, but to subject everything to objects and arguing a defense only in terms objects is self-defeating. In other words, objects become an undermining term. However, when one attempts to understand what is beyond the object, overmining is sorely achieved. Similar conflicts occurred in other discourses such as Eisenman when he attempted to change the language of architecture or with Libeskind trying to remove the mind from design. The dilemma lies in trying to express a new language, either formally or verbally, by still using the same lexicon. The discourse is truly exciting and there is much to be explored. Only through this exploration, exercise, and open dialogue can we clarify the significance of the discourse as a relevant design platform.

Team: Zach Beale, Michael Simmons

Maya, Zbrush, Ultra Fractal, Grasshopper, Maxwell

Professor Jean Jaminet, Winter 2014, Graceland, Memphis, Tennesee

  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.
  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.
  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.
  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.
  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.
  • This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.
The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.
Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS
Census Data: Census.gov
Light Pollution Data: NASA
Independent Study.
Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.

This project is an effort to show the light pollution for the City of Norfolk, VA in comparison with population density, in an aesthetically appealing format and using an algorithmic approach to data visualization. Data containing the block-structure of the City of Norfolk was extruded based upon the population density for the year 2000, then the individual blocks were shattered based upon the amount of light pollution within the city block. Transportation linework was added and sorted based upon Major, Minor and Tertiary road networks, and topography was added for effect.

The process is one continuous algorithm, designed to allow for modification of the initial data streams: revised population data can be added, and the blocks will react and re-shatter based upon projected light pollution data.

Road, Block, Elevation Data: USGS

Census Data: Census.gov

Light Pollution Data: NASA

Independent Study.

Project projection mapped in Global Mapper. The algorithm was designed in Grasshopper and rendered in Maxwell. Total Directory Size: 30 GB. Total Process Time: 8 Hours. Total Render Time: 20 Hours.

  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.
  • TRANSITIVE NEXUS
Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 
Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.
This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.
Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.
Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.
Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.
Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.

TRANSITIVE NEXUS

Situated along the Seine and connected directly to the southeast face of Les Docks Cité de la Mode et du Design, designed by Paris architects Dominique Jakob + Brendan Macfarlane, the project called for a contextual and urban response to the revitalization of the former industrial riverside district in the 13th Arondissement of Paris. The architectural approach began by analyzing social networking data relating to nightlife in the district. This information was used as an initial force for design. Transitive logic was incorporated as a rationale for “folding” the data into a primitive form, and genetic algorithms were built to replicate the primitive within the existing structure, using curves extracted from the form of Les Docks as a parametric input. The final propagated form completes the transitive statement, representing the information from the district. A mesh of surfaces derived from the illumination of Les Docks was applied to create smoothness and continuity between Les Docks and the new architecture. Working in collaboration with Fashion Marketing students, the program provides exhibition space for designer Jorge Ayala on the riverside level, as well as an auditorium for exhibition. Workshop and sales spaces are organized on a roof plaza, in a similar manner to Les Docks’ rooftop. Movement along the Seine is maintained by bending the flow of traffic underneath the building form. A band of circulation from Les Docks’ Wanderlust Bar plaza moves along the facade and penetrates the roof terrace, providing visibility of the Seine in places not provided within Les Docks. 

Collaborative project alongside Les Docks in Paris. Exploration of internet data mining as a form of force generation, transitive logic as a method of converting data into form, and algorithm-based genetic replication as a means of creating a form. Critiqued by Jakob + Macfarlane in France.

This project was also a collaboration with a Fashion Marketing team to exhibit the work of a London contemporary Fashion Designer, complete with exhibition space, performance space, workshop space, and sales space.

Team: Zach Beale, Nicole Winkler, and Austynn Machado.

Grasshopper, Rhino, Maxwell, Illustrator, Photoshop.

Professor Laraine Montgomery, Fall 2013, LaCoste France.

Winner - 2nd Place, International Design Awards. Student/Conceptual Category.

Paris Light Interaction
Algorithmic extrapolation of the brightest areas of Paris’ nightlife extracted from geospatial data. Created as a force diagram during design investigation.
Rhinocerous 3D, Grasshopper, Weaverbird, Kangaroo, Illustrator, AutoCAD, Photoshop.

Paris Light Interaction

Algorithmic extrapolation of the brightest areas of Paris’ nightlife extracted from geospatial data. Created as a force diagram during design investigation.

Rhinocerous 3D, Grasshopper, Weaverbird, Kangaroo, Illustrator, AutoCAD, Photoshop.

  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop
  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop
  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop
  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop
  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop
  • Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale
Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.
Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop

Wall Panel - Exploration of rustication at a small scale

Maya, Rhino, Maxwell. Prototyped on a CNC machine.

Spring 2013, Professor Jean Jaminet. Collaboration with David Harrop

  • Diffusion Space.
Rehabilitation of ruins at the west end of the SCAD Museum. Exploring experiential spaces and performance.
Rhino, Revit, AutoCAD, Illustrator, Photoshop, Maxwell. Board built from laser-cut Balsa with transparent overlays.
  • Diffusion Space.
Rehabilitation of ruins at the west end of the SCAD Museum. Exploring experiential spaces and performance.
Rhino, Revit, AutoCAD, Illustrator, Photoshop, Maxwell. Board built from laser-cut Balsa with transparent overlays.

Diffusion Space.

Rehabilitation of ruins at the west end of the SCAD Museum. Exploring experiential spaces and performance.

Rhino, Revit, AutoCAD, Illustrator, Photoshop, Maxwell. Board built from laser-cut Balsa with transparent overlays.

  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.
  • Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.

Existing Conditions documentation of Hayden Junior High School. Franklin, Virginia. For Lyall Design Architects.

  • Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.

Investigation of simultaneous Surface Characteristics, Apertures, and Ornament within a form. Heavily inspired by spiderwebs and aerodynamic curves. Rhino 5.

Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.

  • Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.
The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.
The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.
The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.
The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.
  • Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.
The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.
Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.

Investigation of Surface Characteristics and construction of a physical prototype through digital fabrication. Heavily inspired by hydrodynamics.

The physical prototype was generated directly in Rhino 5, then sent through AutoCAD for laser cutting. The increased accuracy of fabrication with this method meant that the physical prototype required no adhesive.

Spring 2013, Two week project, professor Jean Jaminet.

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